About

Writer, musician and crochet aficionado. Currently completing a Masters in Performance Studies at the University of Sydney researching artists and urban renewal, and playing with her band No Art.

Search for content

blastedheath:

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), Femme auprès de la fenêtre, Nice, 1920. Oil on canvas, 74 x 59.2 cm.

blastedheath:

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), Femme auprès de la fenêtre, Nice, 1920. Oil on canvas, 74 x 59.2 cm.


(via jesuisperdu)

"In 1953 Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot premiered at a tiny avant-garde theatre in Paris; within five years, it had been translated into more than twenty languages and seen by more than a million spectators. Its startling popularity marked the emergence of a new type of theatre whose proponents – Beckett, Adamov, Ionesco, Genet, Pinter, and others – shattered dramatic conventions and paid scant attention to psychological realism, while highlighting their characters’ inability to understand one another. In 1961, Martin Esslin gave a name to the phenomenon in his ground-breaking study of these playwrights who dramatized the absurdity at the core of the human condition.

Over five decades after its initial publication, Esslin’s landmark book has lost none of its freshness. Authoritative, engaging, and eminently readable, The Theatre of the Absurd is nothing short of a classic: vital reading for anyone with an interest in the theatre.” [via]

First published by Anchor Books, 1961
Second edition first published by Pelican Books, 1968
Third edition first published by Pelican Books, 1980

Review (Lionel Abel, Partisan Review, Summer 1962, pp 454-459)

Publisher

Esslin’s article preceding the book (The Tulane Drama Review 4:4, May 1960)
View online (1972 Pelican Books reprint of the second edition [1968], 463 pp, at Archive.org)
Download (1991 Penguin Books reprint of the third edition [1980], 480 pp, 58 MB, no OCR), Alt link

(Source: jesuisperdu)

The finished blanket

The finished blanket

Dignified and Old, The Modern Lovers

aubreylstallard:

Raoul Dufy, Cannes, la promenade

aubreylstallard:

Raoul Dufy, Cannes, la promenade

(Source: blastedheath)


(via aubreylstallard)
An excellent article about who culture-led urban renewal is serving in Detroit, and who’s left out of the picture. Also serves as a nice follow up to Spike Lee’s recent comments on gentrification in Brooklyn.
Photography: Liza Harvey, outside Michigan Central Station

An excellent article about who culture-led urban renewal is serving in Detroit, and who’s left out of the picture. Also serves as a nice follow up to Spike Lee’s recent comments on gentrification in Brooklyn.

Photography: Liza Harvey, outside Michigan Central Station

dumb-head:

coffeeaspirin:

my pal Nathan Roche launching his new novel this Wednesday at Sedition in Darlinghurst, 7pm, I’m also stocking my jerky there for free cause Im a nice guy.  Video by Matt Banham

nathan is a perfect human being


(via dumb-head)

Some thinking points on gentrification, place and the self

After listening to Spike Lee speaking (/ranting) about gentrification, I’ve started thinking about how and why gentrification means so much to so many of us - even when it’s not a race question. At the same time I’ve been writing a paper on place, and the combination has brought about an interesting way of thinking.

In ‘The right to the city’, David Harvey argues that ‘The question of what kind of city we want cannot be divorced from that of what kind of social ties, relationship to nature, lifestyles, technologies and aesthetic values we desire. The right to the city is far more than the individual liberty to access urban resources: it is a right to change ourselves by changing the city' (my emphasis).* Harvey is operating from a Lefebvrian understanding of space as constructed and is arguing here that in constructing spaces, we are effectively constructing our collective practices and values, and thereby our selves.

There is another way to approach this. If we take on Edward Casey’s assertions of the primacy of place in the human condition, we begin to see why we are so invested in places, particularly those in which we’ve lived for any stretch of time. If, as Casey insists, we ‘live in and through places’ in a phenomenological sense, then change in and to these places strikes at the very core of our being and our perception of the world.

Resistance to processes of gentrification involves more than abstract questions of equity and social justice. It is, in a Bourdieurian sense, a fundamental struggle for the right for our lives to take place in ways that are meaningful to us.

*David Harvey (2008) ‘The right to the city’ New Left review, 53, September-October 2008, p. 23

King Street Newtown, ABC, initial air date 9 January 1995

(Source: thechocolatebrigade)


(via dumb-head)

(Source: pedalfar)